About the Cyberlaw Clinic

Harvard Law School‘s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, provides high-quality, pro-bono legal services to appropriate clients on issues relating to the Internet, technology, and intellectual property. Students enhance their preparation for high-tech practice and earn course credit by working on real-world litigation, client counseling, advocacy, and transactional / licensing projects and cases. The Clinic strives to help clients achieve success in their activities online, mindful of (and in response to) existing law. The Clinic also works with clients to shape the law’s development through policy and advocacy efforts. The Cyberlaw Clinic was the first of its kind, and it continues its tradition of innovation in its areas of practice. The Clinic works independently, with law students supervised by experienced and licensed attorneys.  In some cases, the Clinic collaborates with counsel throughout the country to take advantage of regional or substantive legal expertise.

From the Blog

Cross-Register for “Counseling & Legal Strategy in the Digital Age” Seminar

HLSHarvard Law School will offer the Counseling & Legal Strategy in the Digital Age seminar on Tuesday evenings this fall.  Chris Bavitz and Dalia Topelson of the Cyberlaw Clinic will teach the course, and they encourage cross-registrants to apply.  HLS has reserved a limited number of seats for graduate students from other schools at Harvard, including the Kennedy School, HBS, the GSD, HGSE, and SEAS.

Applications for 2014 i-Lab Venture Incubation Program Are Live!

Harvard Innovation LabApplications for the Harvard Innovation Lab‘s 2014 Venture Incubation program are live!  The Program offers a great opportunity for current Harvard students (including students throughout the university, from the Law School and beyond) who are looking for space and related community resources as they try to build out a venture in the upcoming fall semester.  Information about the program and the application process is available at the i-Lab website.

Featured

Commonwealth v. Augustine

The Cyberlaw Clinic filed an amicus brief (pdf) on behalf of the Electronic Frontier Foundation in the case, Commonwealth v. Augustine, in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. The case concerns whether law enforcement officers can obtain someone’s cell phone location data without first obtaining a warrant. The brief argues that the protections of the US and Massachusetts Constitutions prohibit law enforcement from warrantlessly poring over records of people’s movements. Law enforcement officers must demonstrate probable cause to a neutral member of the judicial branch and act according to a valid warrant before such intense intrusion into people’s privacy is appropriate. Without demonstrating reason to believe that a crime has occurred and that the privacy intrusion is likely to provide specified information relating to the crime, the government has not met its burden.